2008-03-13 - PROCESS CONSOLIDATION PLAN #1 $577,000.00 FOR SCARBOROUGH MEMBERS FOR 90-91 PLANT CLOSURES

March 13, 2008

PROCESS CONSOLIDATION PLAN #1

$577,000.00 FOR SCARBOROUGH MEMBERS FOR 90-91 PLANT CLOSURES

The National Union recently settled a file called “Process Consolidation Plan #1” (a.k.a.: PCP#1), which involved CPC Plant closures and reductions in many locations across the country in 1990-1991. In the Scarborough Local it resulted in the closure of the East Letter Processing Plant located at 280 Progress, now a retail/delivery facility. There were reductions also in Oshawa. There were approximately 900 employees in a bid which was done improperly. Some employees got better than they should have, and some were aggrieved by getting worse than they should have, based on the seniority and staffing rules in effect at the time.

A number of factors were taken into account in settling the Scarborough Local files, 17 years after the fact. Testimony in arbitration would not have been fresh, employees have retired, moved, and died. The National Union, therefore, reached a global settlement as it would take quite a number of years to settle all the files in arbitration.

In terms of the Scarborough Local, 577 members who worked at either E.A.L.P.P. (280 Progress), N.E.M.P.P. (415 Milner) and some other employees in Groups 1 (Clerk, Mail Handler, Despatcher), 3, 4, & 5 (Maintenance) will receive $1000, 00 each, less statutory deductions from the National Union. Many of these employees and others (not entitled in this settlement) previously received payments of $1,125.00 each in PCP#3. PCP#3 was settled for approximately $1,000,000.00 for Scarborough Local members by prior President Bob Irwin (deceased).

While my personal estimation and goal has always been in the $900,000 range or $1,125 for each employee who bid and reported, it was not reasonable. Some employees got better than they should have and were not entitled to compensation. Other employees have moved or died and can not be compensated. The longer the litigation, there are fewer people to compensate.

While the settlement is not what the Local hoped to achieve, given all the factors, it is a reasonable settlement.  $577,000 is not chump change, to bad it doesn’t come out of your supervisor’s pay or the people responsible (a.k.a.: Scarborough Flames).

 

In Solidarity

Mike Duquette
President
Scarborough Local